Critical Race Studies Student Orgs / Journals

  • The Asian Pacific American Law Journal (APALJ) focuses exclusively on the legal, social and political issues affecting Asian Pacific American communities. APALJ plays an important role by providing a forum for legal scholars, practitioners and students to communicate about emerging concerns and by disseminating these writings to the general population. We work hard to reach out to the community and initiate discourse on APA issues. APALJ members are involved in the entire journal publication process, including selection, substantive editing, and cite-checking of all articles and comments. In addition to publishing law journals, APALJ hosts symposia and live speaker series.

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  • APILSA serves as a valuable resource and a significant social support network for law students to succeed academically, socially, politically, and professionally.  APILSA coordinates numerous events and activities that educate and inform members about current Asian Pacific Islander issues, and prepares members to manage such issues in both academic and professional legal settings.  APILSA also provides a common forum for expressing members’ needs and concerns as Asian Pacific Islander law students.  APILSA strives to develop innovative programs that lend academic and peer support, and aspires to continue its long-standing success.

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  • Over the last 30 years, the Chicana/o-Latina/o Law Review (CLLR) has provided an essential forum for the discussion of central issues affecting the Latino community that "mainstream" law journals continue to ignore. In publishing Volume One, the Review introduced to the nation the first legal journal that recognized how common law, statutes, legislative policy and politically popular propositions impact the Latino community. Since 1972, the Review has established a reputation for publishing strong scholarly work on affirmative action and education, Spanish and Mexican land grants, environmental justice, language rights and immigration reform. The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania, Nevada Supreme Court and New Jersey Superior Court have cited the Review as a persuasive authority.​

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  • The UCLA National Black Law Journal has been committed to scholarly discourse exploring the intersection of race and the law for 35 years. The NBLJ was started in 1970 by five African-American law students and two African-American law professors. The Journal was the first of its kind in the country. Because of the drop in African-American students at UCLA School of Law after the passage of Proposition 209, the Journal was sent to Columbia where publication could be continued. One of the Journal's founding editors noted that it was important that there be a forum for providing a theoretical framework for practical daily application of black legal ideas and concepts.

    The Journal has aimed to build on this tradition by publishing articles that make a substantive contribution to current dialogue taking place around issues such as affirmative action, employment law, the criminal justice system, community development and labor issues. The Journal has a commitment to publishing articles that inspire new thought, explore new alternatives and contribute to current jurisprudential stances.

    In 2005, a group of students at UCLA began the process of bringing the Journal back to its birthplace through the organization of a symposium entitled "Regression Analysis: The Status of African-Americans in American Legal Education." In the fall of 2009, a group of committed students reformed the NBLJ Board and in spring 2010, NBLJ was published at UCLA for the first time in more than a decade.

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  • We are dedicated to creating a safe space and a community within the UCLA School of Law where the unique experiences, opinions, challenges and successes of womyn and womyn of color are shared, discussed and developed. We are a collective of individuals who identify as womyn, womyn of color or allies. We are open to all people ready to engage in an open and honest dialogue about race, gender and the law. Our mission is to promote the empowerment, inspiration, and personal and professional development of womyn and people of color in the legal field.​

    We begin from the perspective that the institution of law does not understand, acknowledge or make room for the experiences, opinions and world views of womyn and people of color. The institution of law further actively defines what it means to be a womyn and a person of color in a way that does violence to those identities. We seek to re-frame what it means to be a womyn and a person of color both from within and outside of the law. We begin from the perspective that the UCLA School of Law, as an institution reflective of the greater legal field, fails to create an environment where the political and social identities of womyn and people of color are acknowledged, appreciated or encouraged. We seek to create that environment.

    *We spell "womyn" with a "y" as opposed to the common way of spelling it with an "a" ("woman") because we want to assert ourselves and our views as womyn, consciously rejecting the patriarchal norms that permeate the legal field and society in general.

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