April 2014
Post Doctoral Scholars Announced

Daniela Dover is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the UCLA Law and Philosophy Program. Dover works mainly in social and political philosophy and ethics, but she also has teaching interests in the philosophy of law, metaethics, and ancient philosophy. Her current research focuses on the ethics of communication about ethics and politics. Dover scrutinizes our practices of normative discussion and debate, from everyday interpersonal quarrels to public political deliberation to academic moral philosophy. 

Dover is currently completing a Ph.D. in philosophy at New York University. Before that, she was an undergraduate in Classics at Yale. She has been a visitor at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the Institut Jean Nicod, and the MIT Department of Philosophy. 

Stephen Nayak-Young is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the UCLA Law and Philosophy Program. Nayak-Young’s research and teaching interests are primarily in labor and employment law, philosophy of law, ethics (including normative theory, applied ethics, and metaethics), and social and political philosophy. 

His dissertation undertook a conceptual and normative analysis of the nature and purpose of labor and employment law as it has developed in the U.S., Canada, and other common law jurisdictions. He explores the question to what extent we could legitimately adapt work law’s origins in the domestic relation of master and servant to a governance relationship that is justifiable in a modern liberal society committed to equal treatment of persons. One key normative question raised by this project concerns the justifiability, if any, of the broad, underspecified authority exercised by employers, which the existing regime of work law grants or permits by allowing work relationships to persist in their traditional form. 

Nayak-Young was born and raised in Canada and earned his undergraduate degree in philosophy with first-class honors from the University of British Columbia (1997), followed by a J.D. from Harvard Law School (2000), a M.A. in philosophy from the University of Toronto (2008), and a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Michigan (2014).


April 2014 
Information Session on Law and Philosophy Specialization to be held for UCLA School of Law Students

The Law and Philosophy Program at UCLA offers law students a curriculum in theoretical reasoning about the law as well as a series of intellectual events throughout the year.

It also offers students in their second and third years the opportunity to earn a Law and Philosophy specialization and a special notation on their transcript.  We are the only law school in the country to offer students this opportunity.  Through a four course program of coursework and independent studies, members of the program supplement their more doctrinal courses with sustained theoretical inquiries into the foundations of law and of specific substantive areas.  Pursuing the specialization may lend greater depth to your legal education and improve your writing and argumentation skills.

Join Professor Seana Shiffrin for lunch and a discussion of our curriculum and the specialization on Thursday, April 10 from 12:15 pm to 1:15 pm in Room 2467.  RSVP here.


 February 2014
UCLA Law and Philosophy Students Group to Hold February Conference

The UCLA Law and Philosophy Students Group will hold a conference on Saturday, February 22, 2014 from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm at UCLA School of Law. The conference is an interdisciplinary study of topics in legal theory, ethics, and political philosophy. It will focus on the work of graduate students from around the country. The conference consists of five paper presentations, each of which is followed by comment from a respondent, and then a question and answer session. For more information, visit http://philevents.org/event/show/12590. To register, please email jordan.j.wolf@gmail.com.​


 
October 2013

Law and Philosophy Get-Together on Monday, October 28

Members, affiliates, and friends of the Law and Philosophy Program are invited to a beginning of the year get-together from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm on Monday, October 28 in the Law and Philosophy Reading Room (3112-R) and its environs. Food and drink will be served. Please RSVP to Rachel Estrada at estrada@law.ucla.edu.
 

 
April 2013
Information Session on Law and Philosophy Specialization to be held for UCLA School of Law Students

The Law and Philosophy Program at UCLA offers law students in their second and third years the opportunity to earn a Law and Philosophy specialization and a special notation on their transcript. We are the only law school in the country to offer students this opportunity. Through a four course program of coursework and independent studies, members of the program supplement their more doctrinal courses with sustained theoretical inquiries into the foundations of law and of specific substantive areas. Pursuing the specialization may lend greater depth to your legal education and improve your writing and argumentation skills.

Join Professor Mark Greenberg for lunch and a discussion of this exciting program on Wednesday, April 24 from 12:15 pm to 1:15 pm in Room 1420.
 

 
April 2013
UCLA Law and Philosophy Graduate Conference

The Second Annual UCLA Law and Philosophy Graduate Conference will be held on Saturday, April 13, 2013. Five speakers from a range of law and philosophy backgrounds will be presenting papers, and Matt King, UCLA Law and Philosophy Postdoctoral Scholar, will be delivering the keynote address. A light breakfast and lunch will be provided, and a reception with food and drink will conclude the conference.

9:30-10:00
Light Breakfast
 
10:00-11:00
Seth Mayer (Northwestern University)
“Rawls on Democratic Participation”
Commentator: Sabine Tsuruda (UCLA)
 
11:15-12:15
Govind Persad (Stanford University)
“Libertarian Patriarchalism”
Commentator: Jordan Wolf (UCLA)

12:15-12:45
Lunch

12:45-1:45
Keynote Address: Matt King (UCLA)
“Interminable Blame”

2:00-3:00
Marco Lopez (Princeton University)
“The Euthyphro Problem in American Law”
Commentator: Jonathan Gingerich (UCLA)

3:15-4:15
Micha Glaeser (Harvard University)
“(How) Does Morality Depend on Law?”
Commentator: Brian Hutler (UCLA)

4:15-5:15
Ronni Sadovsky (Harvard University)
“Color-Consciousness and its Limits”
Commentator: Lee-Ann Chae (UCLA)

5:15 Reception
 
 

September 2012

Fall 2012 Legal Theory Workshop Schedule Posted

The schedule for the Fall 2012 Legal Theory Workshop has been posted to the workshop page. The Legal Theory Workshop features prominent speakers from other universities. Students are encouraged to attend.


 
September 2012
Law and Philosophy Get-Together on Tuesday, October 9

Members, affiliates, and friends of the Law and Philosophy Program are invited to a beginning of the year get-together on Tuesday, October 9 from noon to 1:00 pm in the Law and Philosophy Reading Room (3112-R) and its environs. Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to Rachel Estrada at estrada@law.ucla.edu.


 
July 2012
Post Doctoral Scholars Announced

 

Robert Hughes is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the UCLA Law and Philosophy Program. Hughes’ teaching interests include political philosophy, ethical theory, applied ethics, philosophy of law, philosophy of action, Kant, and introduction to philosophy. He won the Distinguished Teaching Award for the Department of Philosophy at UCLA in 2009, and the Yost Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 2007.

Hughes’ research focuses on the relationship between law and coercion, the justification of democracy, and issues of justice in health care and clinical research.
His dissertation, “Governing the Good,” challenges the widespread assumption that wherever law and government go, coercion is sure to accompany them. He argues that the entitlement to make law does not necessarily come with an entitlement to enforce law coercively.

Hughes earned his undergraduate degree in Philosophy with High Honors from Harvard University (2001) and his Ph.D. in Philosophy with a specialization in Law and Philosophy from UCLA (2010). He has recently been a post-doctoral fellow in the Bioethics Department of the National Institutes of Health.

 

Matt King is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the UCLA Law and Philosophy Program. King has designed and taught courses on theoretical and applied ethics, philosophy of action, and political philosophy. He won the Distinguished Teaching Assistant Award at the University of Maryland in 2006.

King’s research interests lie at the crossroads of Ethics and Action Theory, specifically in theories of moral responsibility. His research explores the connections between moral psychology, responsibility, and moral theory and how they come together to inform our evaluations of agents. He has written on negligence, and continues to be concerned with the relationship between moral responsibility, criminal responsibility, and civil liability.
​​ King received his B.A. from the University of Virginia in 2002. He earned his M.A. (2005) and Ph.D. in philosophy (2008) from the University of Maryland. He was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Maryland and Visiting Assistant Professor at Carleton College and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He has recently been a Visiting Assistant Professor at St. Bonaventure University.  
 

 
April 2012
Law and Philosophy Program Welcomes Visiting Scholar
 

George Pavlakos will visit the UCLA Law and Philosophy Program as a Visiting Scholar in spring/summer 2012. He is a Research Professor of Globalisation and Legal Theory at the Faculty of Law, University of Antwerp and a Professor of Legal Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. in 2005-2006 and, for a second time in 2011, he was an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow at the University of Kiel, Germany. George is the Director of the Centre of Law and Cosmopolitan Values, University of Antwerp, joint editor of Jurisprudence (Hart Publishing) and general editor of the book series Law and Practical Reason (Hart Publishing).
 During his stay at UCLA he will be expanding the 'Model of Norms', a theoretical account of the grounds of legal obligation, which he has been advancing on a number of occasions over the past few years. Parallel to that - in a somewhat interrelated manner - he will aim to complete a paper on the role that psychological states of the will play in the grounding of obligations in Kant's moral and political philosophy.
 

 
 
April 2012
UCLA Law and Philosophy Graduate Student Conference to be held on Saturday, April 7, 2012


The UCLA Law and Philosophy Students Group is holding the UCLA Law and Philosophy Graduate Student Conference on Saturday, April 7,2012 in UCLA Law School Room 1347.

Four speakers from a range of law and philosophy backgrounds will be presenting papers, and Professor Mark Greenberg will be delivering the keynote address. A light breakfast and lunch will be provided, and a reception with food and drink will conclude the conference.

No RSVP is required, and this activity qualifies for 6.5 hours of general MCLE credit.
 
9:00-10:15
Alexis Dyschkant (University of Illinois) "Punishing Liars: Spatial Interaction and Kant's Political Philosophy"
Commentator: C. Thi Nguyen (UCLA/Utah Valley University)

10:15-11:30
Boris Babic (Quinn Emanuel)
"Non Execution: The President's Dilemma and the Limits of Judicial Review"
Commentator: Jason Pang (UCLA Law)

11:30-12:00     Lunch

12:00-1:30
Keynote Address: Mark Greenberg (UCLA Law and Philosophy) "Law as Morality"

1:45-3:00
Olivia Bailey (Harvard University)
"Control, Contempt, and Ignorance of the Law"
Commentator: Sabine Tsuruda (UCLA Philosophy)

3:00-4:15
David Gottlieb (Sullivan & Cromwell)
"Is Legal Realism a Distinctive Feature of Well-Functioning Legal Systems? Consequences of a Deflated Realism"
Commentator: Jonathan Gingerich (UCLA Philosophy)

4:15
Reception
 

 
March 2012
Information Session on Law and Philosophy Specialization to be held for UCLA School of Law Students

The Law and Philosophy Program at UCLA offers law students in their second and third years the opportunity to earn a Law and Philosophy specialization and a special notation on their transcript. We are the only law school in the country to offer students this opportunity. Through a four course program of coursework and independent studies, members of the program supplement their more doctrinal courses with sustained theoretical inquiries into the foundations of law and of specific substantive areas. Pursuing the specialization may lend greater depth to your legal education and improve your writing and argumentation skills.

Join Professors Shiffrin and Greenberg for lunch and a discussion of this exciting program on Thursday, April 19 from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm in Room 1327. Lunch will be catered by Clementine.