Public Interest Student Orgs / Journals

  • The Advocates for Children and Teens provides the law school with 1) a forum for discussing policy that affects children and 2) a community that supports and encourages academic and service-oriented child advocacy.  To those ends, we bring speakers to the school to talk with students about their research or work pertinent to the field of children's law.  We also organize meet and greets and serve as a resource for students seeking volunteer placements with organizations that deal with children's issues.

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  • The Animal Law Society at UCLA is dedicated to combating injustices against animals through education, advocacy, and scholarship to protect animals in the legal system and raise awareness of the field of animal law. ALS is committed to opposing all forms of institutionalized animal abuse, and engaging in projects that challenge that abuse.

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  • The Disability Law Journal at UCLA (DLJ) focuses on current topics in disability law and related fields. The DLJ seeks to develop a discourse regarding disability law by publishing articles; editorials; and interviews of practitioners, academics, policymakers, and other members of the disability law community. The DLJ also seeks to recognize the contributions to the field of disability law made by scholars before the establishment of the DLJ, and we do so by republishing relevant scholarship as necessary. The ultimate mission of the DLJ is to create a repository of disability law scholarship.

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  • Disability Law Society (DLS) is a safe space for students with and without disabilities interested in disability law and policy. We understand that each disability is unique, and our experiences with disability vary. We serve all people with disabilities, ranging from physical, intellectual/developmental, and mental health. Because disability is intersectional and affects us all, we believe in the benefit of infusing a disability justice consciousness to every area of advocacy. DLS works to foster awareness and professional development for those interested in disability law, through programming and networking opportunities.

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  • Each year, scholars, lawyers, judges, and law students throughout the United States publish hundreds of law review articles concerning various aspects of sexual orientation and gender identity law. The Williams Institute and the students at UCLA School of Law who staff the journal initiated the Dukeminier Awards to acknowledge and distribute the best of these articles.

    The goals of the journal and its awards are to encourage scholars to begin or continue writing about sexual orientation and gender identity law and public policy; provide valuable recognition and support for scholars, law students, and lawyers who write in this area; and provide easy access to each year’s best scholarly materials for those outside of legal academia, including lawyers, judges, other legal actors, and policy makers. Those who receive the Dukeminier Award will have their article republished in the Dukeminier Awards Journal.

    The Dukeminier Awards Journal is edited in partnership with the Williams Institute and staffed by students at UCLA School of Law. Staff recruitment of first-year students begins in the spring. Interested 1Ls may reach out to daj@lawnet.ucla.edu with any questions.

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  • El Centro Legal is UCLA School of Law’s student-coordinated network of volunteer legal aid clinics. Through each of El Centro's clinics, students provide legal services on a volunteer basis to a variety of communities in the greater Los Angeles area. Clinics focus on issues related to bankruptcy, education, homelessness, HIV/AIDS, immigration, juvenile justice, landlord/tenant, domestic violence and workers’ rights. Each Clinic has its own volunteers, leadership, practice area, and client base.

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  • We are the Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance and we are here to serve as a law journal that publishes writings concerning Native Peoples’ cultures, traditions, and histories. We publish with the goal of bettering and advancing Native Nations and Indian People. Our Journal is here to actively resist against the insidious effects of colonialism, racism, and the subjugation of Native Peoples. We promote Native scholarship, both student and faculty, and support Native scholars and voices. We partner with Native communities to publish writings that will bring attention to their specific situations and legal battles. We discuss any and all legal struggles faced by Native Nations and Indian People and in so doing actively seek out publishable material from the traditional as well as the intellectual perspective.

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  • We affirm the strength brought to the study of law by a law student's personal religious conviction. We strive through public service and diligence in our studies to promote fairness and virtue founded upon the rule of law.

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  • La Raza's primary focus is to recruit, support, and graduate Raza students. We advocate for training that prepares students to meet the needs of the legally underserved, particularly in the Latino/a community. La Raza provides academic support for Raza students, serve as an organizing force around Raza political issues, and creates a social atmosphere that promotes Raza culture and experience.

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  • UCLA Law Students for Immigrant Justice (LSIJ) seeks to develop future immigration law practitioners and advocates, mobilize UCLA Law students to participate in advocacy efforts on behalf of immigrants in the Los Angeles community, foster immigration and immigrants’ rights-related dialogue at UCLA School of Law and the greater UCLA campus, and connect UCLA Law students to the broader community by recruiting and organizing students to volunteer with community agencies that provide free and low-cost legal services for immigrants.

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  • The UCLA National Black Law Journal has been committed to scholarly discourse exploring the intersection of race and the law for 35 years. The NBLJ was started in 1970 by five African-American law students and two African-American law professors. The Journal was the first of its kind in the country. Because of the drop in African-American students at UCLA School of Law after the passage of Proposition 209, the Journal was sent to Columbia where publication could be continued. One of the Journal's founding editors noted that it was important that there be a forum for providing a theoretical framework for practical daily application of black legal ideas and concepts.

    The Journal has aimed to build on this tradition by publishing articles that make a substantive contribution to current dialogue taking place around issues such as affirmative action, employment law, the criminal justice system, community development and labor issues. The Journal has a commitment to publishing articles that inspire new thought, explore new alternatives and contribute to current jurisprudential stances.

    In 2005, a group of students at UCLA began the process of bringing the Journal back to its birthplace through the organization of a symposium entitled "Regression Analysis: The Status of African-Americans in American Legal Education." In the fall of 2009, a group of committed students reformed the NBLJ Board and in spring 2010, NBLJ was published at UCLA for the first time in more than a decade.

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  • Our mission is to create safe and healing spaces where survivors of sexual and gender-based trauma can find community and support on the law school campus; to help end stigma against survivors of sexual and gender-based trauma in our law school community, in the legal profession, in our greater community, and in the world at large; to promote awareness of the effects of sexual trauma on human beings and the ways that sexual and gender-based trauma interacts with other forms of trauma and interacts with people’s diverse identities to create unique harms and challenges; to advocate for accommodations and cultural shifts on behalf of survivors of sexual and gender-based trauma based on their needs and preferences; and to do anything else that we can to help create a safer world where people’s boundaries are respected and survivors of sexual trauma are able to thrive.

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  • The purpose of this organization is to explore and discuss issues pertaining to life as a secularist and to advocate for causes which further the rights of secularists.

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  • The Voting Rights & Political Law Society’s purpose is to provide a student-led forum to develop knowledge, share experiences, and promote opportunities within the field of voting rights and political law. The Voting Rights & Political Law Society seeks to provide opportunities students within the law school on-and-off-campus for civic service, learning, scholarship, and career assistance. The Voting Rights & Political Law Society also hopes to build positive and mutually-beneficial relationships with local, national, and international voting rights organizations.

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